June 2014

28
Jun
2014
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Neglect verdict at Brian Dalrymple inquest

• Home Office contractors agree “significant” financial settlement

• 77-year-old locum doctor did not know detention centre rules

• Brian Dalrymple, a 35-year-old American tourist, died of natural causes; neglect was a contributing factor – inquest verdict

• Mother pays tribute to “warm and loving man”

An inquest jury ruled today that Brian Dalrymple, the American tourist detained at two UK immigration removal centres, died of natural causes and neglect was a contributing factor.

The jury found: “Throughout Mr Dalrymple’s detention at Harmondsworth medical record keeping was shambolic.”

We can reveal that on the eve of the inquest, three Home Office contractors agreed to a “significant” financial settlement for the mother of Brian Dalrymple.

  • The settlement was agreed with:


27
Jun
2014
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'We want to work without being treated as slaves'

Greenhouses in Beqa'ot settlement, photo by Corporate Watch February 2013

During January 2013, Corporate Watch conducted interviews with Palestinians who work in the illegal Israeli settlements in the Jordan Valley. Part one to three of our findings can be read here, here and here.

We met 44 year old Rashid* and 38 year old Zaid* in their hometown of Tammoun in the northern West Bank. They both work in the illegal Israeli settlement of Beqa'ot. A colony with 171 residents situated close to the Palestinian community of Al Hadidya in the Jordan Valley.


27
Jun
2014
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Medical care in UK detention a 'lamentable failure'

Doctor who saw the American tourist before his death knew neither mental health law nor detention centre rules - Coroner sums up Brian Dalrymple inquest

In West London today, Coroner Jeremy Chipperfield summed up the evidence at the inquest into the death of Brian Dalrymple, a 35-year-old schizophrenic American who died in a British detention centre on 31 July 2011 from a ruptured aorta.

Brian Dalrymple had come to England for a holiday, but instead was detained on arrival after immigration officers found his behaviour “odd” and denied him entry on 14 June 2011. Dalrymple later claimed asylum, which border guards said was “unusual for a US citizen”.

The inquest has heard detailed evidence about the subsequent six weeks that Dalrymple spent in two commercially run detention centres: Harmondsworth run by GEO, the American prisons company, and Colnbrook, run by Serco, the UK oursourcer.


25
Jun
2014
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A shareholder activist's account of the G4S AGM

Protest at G4S Agm 2014

The G4S AGM, on 5 June 2014, passed with predictable controversy. More than 10 protesting G4S shareholders and proxies were forcibly removed, in some instances by being dragged across the floor by their hands, and the shareholder questions were overwhelmingly focussed on G4S’ actions in the Occupied Palestinian Territories (OPT), HMP Oakwood and other prisons and detention facilities which G4S are involved in globally.

 The atmosphere was confrontational, verging on combative. More than 10 members of security flanked the sides of the room, leading one shareholder to tell the Board: “I haven't been eyeballed this much since Chelsea [football matches] in the 1980s.” Another added: “this cannot be acceptable. You cannot have people being dragged out.”


20
Jun
2014
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Brian Dalrymple inquest day 4: Serco on the stand

  • Serco guard that collected Dalrymple from Harmondsworth was not meant to escort detainees - "only time in five years"

  • Crucial medical records were not transferred with Dalrymple between detention centres despite protocol

  • Serco nurse tells inquest about years of problems communicating with healthcare company at neighbouring detention centre, and says Home Office only made 'slight improvement' in early 2014

At West London Coroner's Court yesterday, the inquest into the death of Brian Dalrymple, an American tourist suffering from schizophrenia, heard about the last days of his life, spent in a segregation cell of a commercially-run British detention centre.


20
Jun
2014
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L-3 and Garrett supplying equipment for Gaza checkpoint

The Beit Hanoun (Erez) checkpoint, photo taken from the Palestinian side by the Beit Hanoun Local Initiative, 2013

The Beit Hanoun (Erez) crossing is the only crossing for people who want to go directly from Gaza into the 1948 borders of Israel. People wishing to cross must apply for a permit and only a small number of permits are granted. Privileged people such as foreign journalists (who are not overly critical of Israel), NGO workers, business people and politicians are often granted permits. Other people have to go through the Rafah crossing from southern Gaza into Egypt.

The Beit Hanoun crossing is subject to frequent closures by the Israeli authorities. The terminal has been closed since the kidnapping of three Israeli teenagers in the West Bank on 12 June. This closure amounts to an act of collective punuishment against everyone in Gaza by the Israeli state.


18
Jun
2014
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Guide to fracking and unconventional fossil fuels

From the dangers of fracking to the devastating effects of tar sands extraction, this guide brings together everything you need to know about unconventional fossil fuels in one place for the first time.

The endless pursuit of economic growth, coupled with the decline in conventional energy sources, is driving ever more extreme forms of energy extraction around the world, with ecologically and socially disastrous consequences.

The report gives an in-depth yet accessible analysis of the social and environmental effects of unconventional fossil fuels, and includes information on where they are found, the companies trying to profit from them and the growing resistance movements against them. The report also contains a unique 'carbon budget' climate change assessment of unconventional fossil fuel production, and stand-alone factsheets on each of the types of unconventional fossil fuel.

To buy a copy of the report, or download it for free go to:


17
Jun
2014
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Brian Dalrymple Inquest: Day 1

Brian Dalrymple (Credit: Dalrymple family)

Who takes responsibility when a detainee dies in custody: the State or a corporation?

On 14 June 2011, a white American tourist landed at Heathrow. It was to be a holiday from hell. Six weeks later this man died in a British detention centre.

An inquest opened yesterday at West London Coroner's Court three years after the death of 35 year-old Brian Dalrymple.

He was held at Harmondsworth Immigration Removal Centre (IRC) for 43 days, before being transferred to Serco's Colnbrook IRC where he spent the last week of his life.

The coroner started the proceedings by telling the jury that this was not a question of attributing blame, but it was to establish how and in what circumstances he came by his death while detained by the state.


11
Jun
2014
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New factsheet: guide to travelling to Gaza

Rafah Crossing – seen from the Palestinian side - Photo taken by Corporate Watch, December 2013

06
Jun
2014
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Workers paid below the minimum wage in the Israeli settlement of Na'ama

Greenhouses in the settlement of Na'ama, picture taken by Corporate Watch in January 2013

During January 2013, Corporate Watch conducted interviews with Palestinians who work in the illegal Israeli settlements in the Jordan Valley. Part one and two of our findings can be read here and here.

Ayman works in the illegal Israeli settlement of Na'ama. He comes from the Northern West Bank, outside the Jordan Valley. His work is arranged through a local Palestinian intermediary. He sets off for work at 3am through Tayasir military checkpoint. In Na'ama his work consists of planting tarragon, sage, mint, thyme, onions and chillies.