December 2015

18
Dec
2015
tom's picture

Turkish military brutality in Diyarbakır

The Kurdish city of Amed (Diyarbakır in Turkish), is currently under attack by Turkish state forces. Amed is situated within the borders of Turkey and its residents are locked in a decades long struggle for self determination. In November, people erected barricades in the neighbourhood of Sur, part of Amed's historic old town, to protect their autonomy and prevent the Turkish police and army from entering. Since then six consecutive curfews have been imposed in the city and police and military have attacked densely populated residential neighbourhoods with heavy weaponry. The current curfew is on its 17th day.


15
Dec
2015
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The Foster Care Business

Almost 86,000 children were in foster care in the UK last year. The support they receive from their foster carers can make a huge difference to their lives.

Foster care placements are still paid for publicly but they are increasingly organised by private companies, for a profit.* The number of children who need foster care is going up, and it has become a “growth market”, according to the Financial Times. Even with council spending hit by austerity cuts, it is attracting an ever-wider range of companies and investors.


12
Dec
2015
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Ecocide of mangrove swamps bringing catastrophes ashore

Mangroves are among the most powerful natural defences against global warming. But their decline, due to the spread of polluting agents and clearances to make way for big business, is putting countries like Mexico at risk of catastrophic natural disasters. Almudena Serpis writes for Corporate Watch from Cancun, about the importance of mangroves and the growing resistance against their destruction.

Preventing disaster in Cancún

Amongst the luxury of Cancun´s hotels and hectic shopping malls, just a few metres away from the Caribbean sea, we walk through empty concrete pathways which cross the city's impressive mangrove swamp. But despite it being one of Cancun's last wild nature enclaves, it is the focus of a million dollar investment plan to transform it into a tourist building complex.


07
Dec
2015
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Capitalism or the World

 

Throughout 2015 Corporate Watch has been organising a series of workshops on capitalism and climate change. The workshops have generated some fascinating, thoughtful discussions exploring the overlaps and interactions between climate change and capitalism, and what it means to have agency in tackling these enormous issues.

Informed by these conversations, we wanted to write some thoughts on the UN climate negotiations in Paris and the situation with anti-capitalism and the 'radical' climate movements around the world. We produced a poster and wrote the following short text to distribute during the summit. If you'd like to share your thoughts drop us a line at contact [ at ] corporatewatch.org


04
Dec
2015
tom's picture

The struggle for autonomy in North Kurdistan: Voices from Cizre

People in cities across North Kurdistan (the part of Kurdistan within Turkey's borders) are fighting for their autonomy from the Turkish state. Several cities made declarations of self-rule in Summer 2015 in response to attacks by the police and army. Barricades have been erected in city centres and people have taken up arms to prevent state forces from entering their neighbourhoods.


03
Dec
2015

Court hears detainee death only costs £10,000 fine

The Information Tribunal heard an appeal today by the Home Office against an Information Commissioner decision requiring it to release data regarding failures by commercial contractors at the Harmondsworth and Colnbrook immigration detention centres.

In a freedom of information request, Corporate Watch asked the Home Office for internal audits of the two detention centres written by contractors Serco and the Geo Group and detailing the companies' performance against their multi-million pound contracts.

Some information regarding the level of contractual penalties was released. Amongst other details, the court heard that the Home Office imposes a penalty of just £10,000 for an incident of self-harm resulting in death. This is a worryingly low figure for an incident of such magnitude.