October 2016

18
Oct
2016
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CalaisResearch: 40 companies profiting from the eviction and border violence

The eviction of the Calais jungle is about to begin, but who does this act of brutality serve? On the one hand, cynical politicians looking to the French presidential election next year, desperately trying to cling onto power with a show of toughness. But also, it will boost the profits of a host of private companies who supply the rubber bullets and barbed wire, bulldozers and deportation buses.

Calais Research Network, a research group formed this August in which Corporate Watch is participating, has compiled an expanded list of over 40 companies profiting from the border regime. These companies have an interest in building up ‘security’ in Calais and beyond, part of a flourishing industry surrounding everything from the privatization of lorry inspections to the manufacturing of tear gas canisters, and the constantly proliferating fences and walls along the highway.


11
Oct
2016
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Ten years since Climate Camp: return to Drax

 

Biofuelwatch explain why we still need to axe Drax ten years after the first Camp for Climate Action.

Ten years ago, 600 people converged on Drax Power Station in Yorkshire for the first ever Camp for Climate Action. They were there because Drax, then burning 13 million tonnes of coal and emitting over 20 million tonnes of CO2 a year, was the single largest source of emissions in the UK - as Corporate Watch noted in 2006, there were 100 countries that emitted less than Drax.


07
Oct
2016
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When Mitie care workers fight back

Anne’s first call started at 7am and her last finished at 10pm. She went from house to house, calling in on vulnerable clients, 15, sometimes 20 calls each day, helping clients to wash and dress, emptying and cleaning their commodes, administering their medicine, preparing their meals, keeping them company — the only person they might see all day.

Anne worked for MiHomecare, one of the corporate chains that dominate the UK home care market. She was one of 220,000 care workers in the UK last year being paid less than the minimum wage — (then £6.70 per hour, now £7.20).